Easy Night Sky Photography

Milky Way

How to Take Great Night Photos

What a lot of people don’t know is that it is relatively inexpensive and easy to take great night photos. The Milky Way, stars, and Moon are all within your reach. You can get some extremely cool-looking photos of them without a lot of effort. Here’s how…
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Expose to the Right? NO! Go left!

Exposure

“Expose to the right” has been a popular saying and method of exposure for digital photographers for years, and it works in some cases. I’ll show you how to go the other way and make it work also. Maybe the time of “expose to the right” is almost over (in some cases). Here’s why… Continue reading

Storm Light

What is “Storm Light?”

“Storm light” is a special kind of outdoor lighting that occurs usually just after a storm has passed. The atmosphere is usually full of small particles of dust, rain, and ice, and this creates a unique coloration of the sky and land. It is one of the best, most difficult, most dangerous, and rarest of times to shoot landscape photos. Continue reading

Camera Lens Filter Effects You Can’t Get From Post-Processing

Software can do a lot to post-process your photos, but it can’t do everything. Sometimes, you just have to use a filter on your camera to achieve certain photos. Here are what filters you will absolutely have to have on hand in order to get those shots! (click to tweet) Continue reading

Scouting Shots

Before setting out to shoot some photos, it is always a good idea to scout¹ out some locations that may produce great shots. The idea here is to go and find those spots where a great photo could be taken, so that you can set up and be ready to go when conditions are right and the photo is there for the taking! It is very similar to what good hunters do when they are preparing to hunt their prey.

“But where?”  I’m glad you asked. Here’s some ideas “where” and more importantly here’s “how,” “why”, and “when!” Continue reading

Flashlights for Outdoor Photography

When out taking photos, every good photographer has a good flashlight with them. If you’re a time-lapse or night photographer, it is essential equipment and a red light in it is best for the eyes (not reviewed here). But every outdoor photographer has a need for a good flashlight during those “golden hours” before sunrise or after sunset when the best photos can be taken. And, as a safety item, it’s invaluable!

I’ve used a few different flashlights over the years, and have settled on the following ones as the best and brightest!

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Video: Time Lapse of Night Sky – My Second

Click to View“Time Lapse of Night Sky #2” is the second time lapse video I made, this time capturing a different view of the night sky with some different settings.

Like in my first attempt, in this video, I included all of the settings that I used to make this time lapse video. It is in the beginning of this video and you will have to pause it in order to read it through.

I wanted to give you an idea of the kind of set-up that was required and just how many shots went into the making of this very short and simple time lapse!

I am starting to get into making time lapse videos, and will post future attempts with settings and equipment that I’ve used.

Video: Time Lapse of Night Sky – My First

Click to ViewTime Lapse of Night Sky #1 is a time lapse video I made, capturing the night sky!

In the video, I included all of the settings that I used to make this time lapse video. It is in the beginning of this video and you will have to pause it in order to read it through.

I wanted to give you an idea of the kind of set-up that was required and just how many shots went into the making of this very short and simple time lapse!

I am starting to get into making time lapse videos, and will post future attempts with settings and equipment that I’ve used.

Realism in a Photo

The sun is bright and when you look toward it, your eyes can’t see any detail in it. It is “blown out” in your eyes. Is this any surprise? No. Shocking information? No. Well then why do we as photographers complain when our photos show the sun as a feature-less blown-out highlight? It is, after all, what you would have seen had you been standing there behind the camera isn’t it? Of course it is.

Let’s say you’re standing in a dark ravine looking up with dark rocky outcroppings all around, but a bright sun shining above. Do your eyes see detail in the shadows? Of course not. Surprising? No. Something wrong with your eyes? No. It’s a high-contrast scene and this is what your actually seeing. So why do we as photographers when we look at the photo later, feel as if we’ve failed somehow because the shadows in our photo are black without much detail. It was, after all, exactly what we saw when we were there.

How well can you see details on the horizon? Are treelines perfectly clear to you? No. What about the haze in the air. Do those distant tress or mountains look perfectly clear? No. Could they be a little out of focus to your eyes? Sure. When we get behind the lens though, we want everything to be sharp and clear – but clearly not how we actually saw it. Why?

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